Uniforms and Bicycle

This post is all about the people  on the streets of Kyoto, where outfits inspired by a huge variety of times and places co-exist.

School girls wear a smart uniform based on the Edwardian style of sailor collars, which was popular for children of both sexes in all European countries in the early 20th century.

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Uniforms in the Market
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Scaffolder

A very different uniform is worn by the builders, like this scaffolder in wide trousers and shoes with a separate big toe, as favoured by the designer Martin Margiela.

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Rickshaw Style

Rickshaws are a popular means of transport ariound the biggest temples and shrines, the rickshaw men do thier own thing with their simple uniforms.

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Rickshaw Pirate

Some of the rickshaw guys go for a pirate style of head gear

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Rickshaw Bandana
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Smoking Break

Three waiters show off their uniforms, the one on the right is laughing because Colin had just tried to take their photo with the lens cap still on.

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Kimono Workwear

A simple kimino jacket with writing on the lapels is worn by many workers in the covered marke

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Fishmongers

 In the fish mongers the ladies wear jolly aprons

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The Well Dressed Waitress

In the smarter restaurants the ladies wear traditional kimonos in restrained colours, like this lovely indigo one, which balances the typical Kyoto interior style of plain sand walls and delicate wood screen

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Monk

The oldest style uniform in Kyoto is worn by the monks of the Soto Zen Buddhist order, who beg in the streets as part of their aesetic disipline, wearing clothes virtually unchanged since the Middle Ages. They say a prayer for you in exchange for alms.

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The Mark of the Individual

Meanwhile individuality is expressed, especially by young people, who wear whatever works in a spring climate that veers from freezing and sleety to lovely and sunny in one hour.

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Harris Tweed Hat

Hats are important in this weather and thought goes into choosing the right ones.

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Cool Dresser

Its not just the youth who are individualistic, this market stall holder is cool with his beanie hat, flash of neon at the neck and wonderful trousers patched with vintage indigo work kimono pieces.

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Keen Young Shopper

A typical look for young women is a branded hand bag, jeans, pea coat, and the essential mobile phone.

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Kimono Woman

But as young woman might just as easily be in a lovley kimono, as this lady outside our favourite cafe. Many students are graduating this week and they tend to wear kimonos for the ceremonies.

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Blossom Watching Blossom
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